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Clan MacThomas

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Genealogy Research
 
This section of the website contains a brief summary of the investigations into family history carried out by the Sennachie on behalf of MacThomas clansmen.
You do not have to be a member of the Clan MacThomas Society to ask the Sennachie for help with your research, although the extent of research undertaken for non-members will be extremely limited. It should be stressed that neither the Sennachie nor the Society offers a paid research service. However it should be pointed out that the benefits of joining the Society may be good value for money when compared with the cost of employing a professional genealogist. 

Please use this link to contact the Sennachie if you have anything to add to the responses above or have some advice that you would like.

Investigations undertaken to date include:

(Key: Q = Question, R = Response)

  

New entries will appear here

Macumber
(US)

(050)

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Added 21/02/14

Q

A number of enquiries have been received in recent years asking if Macumber is a spelling variation of a Clan name.

R

Sennachie replied that he is not aware Macumber is linked to the Clan, nor for that matter Macomber. The opposite is a strong possibility as both names are recorded in church registers in southern England in the 17th century, even as early as 1615. A search of the following sites reveals that the name does not appear in early Scottish records - scotlandspeople, ancestry and familysearch. A search of family trees on rootsweb and ancestry reveals many people are researching Macumber and Macomber and there are links to England rather than Scotland. Also present in England in many numbers are Cumber and Comber, indicating that the origins of all the above names being in England. Also see number 43 below.

Tomb
(US)

(049)

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Added 15/02/14

Q

In the course of my research the enquirer found an ancestor, Matthew Tomb, who emigrated to the US from County Antrim, Northern Ireland. Some of his cousins spelt their name Thom so can only assume they were pronounced the same. The enquirer asks if Tomb is a variant of Thom, perhaps changed upon settlement in Northern Ireland? He assumes that would then give me a connection to Clan MacThomas. 

R

The Society replied that Ulster (back in the day) did have significantly more Scots than Irish. Most of the Scots that were sent to Ireland by the King were from the lower west coast of Scotland. Surname research validates that Tomb in Scotland is found to be more prevalent in the Scottish Lowlands. 
Clan MacThomas is a centuries-old offshoot of Clan MacIntosh. The Clan founder was a younger son of the MacIntosh Clan chief, Thomas. Upon reaching adulthood, Thomas decided to set off on his own, taking his family and certain followers over the Grampians in Perth. The Clan descendants were historically found east of the Grampians, in Perth, Angus/Forfar and Fife.

At this time the Society is unable to verify a connection to the surname Tomb. Research suggests that your relative most likely hailed from the Scottish Lowlands, and not the eastern Highlands. If a connection can be found to the east side of Scotland then the Sennachie would be willing to assist the enquirer in determining a connection to the Clan.

Thomson
(UK)

(048)

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Added 18/12/13

Q

The enquirer is researching her husband's family tree and is interested in the migration of Thomson and its history throughout Scotland. James Thomson was a teacher from Banffshire, for the Society in Scotland for Propagation of Christian Knowledge. She asks where they would have originally come from?  Also would they be related to the Glenshee Thomsons?  She would welcome any information. 

R

Sennachie advised that Thomson is a very popular name in Scotland. Many Thomsons come from Argyll in the west of Scotland and are likely to be originally MacTavishes, some are from the Borders Region with England and are not affiliated to a Highland Clan. Only those people whose ancestors come from the counties are Perthshire, Angus, Fife, Aberdeen and Kincardineshire, are likely to be MacThomases.  Banff is close to these counties so there is a chance that your James or the generation before could be from one of the above, especially as a teacher tends to move to where needed.

Only research on your Thomson line will reveal earlier locations.  This is especially important for the sept name Thomson in view of its popularity. He asks if the enquirer has used the sites worldconnect and familysearch.org.

Thom
(USA)

(047)

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Added 18/12/13

Q

The enquirer is researching the ancestry of her grandfather, Alexander Mitchell Thom.  His father was James Thom who married Mary Baxter at Auchindoir in 1864, and his grandfather was John Thom who married Jane Barclay.  Her grandfather stayed in Manatoba with a Thom relative who was either a Minister or Missionary who had been to Africa. Since she does not know their given name she has hit a wall on her research. She asks if the Sennachie can suggest some avenues for research. 

R

Sennachie noted that several researchers on rootsweb's worldconnect site are researching this family; perhaps they can assist.  Many missionaries and/or ministers of religion, had a university degree.  So she could try searching alumni of UK universities, for example St Andrews, Cambridge, Oxford.  As an example, Arthur Murray Thom graduated from Cambridge, became a missionary, served in Africa, but, it seems, did not go to Canada.  Wikipedia's site List of Christian missionaries, may also be useful. Sennachie suggested that she could use her search engine to see if any missionaries served or lived in Manatoba.

Thomason
(USA)

(046)

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Added 03/11/13

Q

The enquirer has been tracing her family history back from her grandfather Billy Ray Thomason, and was woundering if there were ways to find out more information from clan records. She remembers being told as a youngster about the clan. It seemed like a fairy tale. She is now Billy's oldest living grandchild and wants to trace the family's ancestors for younger generations. She asks how she can go about this. 

R

Sennachie advised that he was unaware that Thomason has a connection to the Clan MacThomas.  Searching the internet reveals the name generally does not appear in the eastern highland counties of Scotland. Note that it is present in England and the Shetland Islands. There is a Rootsweb mailing list for Thomason and that list, over the years, has not raised the possibility of a connection to the Clan MacThomas. The distribution of Thomason is also confirmed by searching the site: http://gbnames.publicprofiler.org/default.aspx

There is some misleading information on the internet relating to the sept names of the Clan. Thomason may originate from the name Thomas which is a sept name of the Clan. However, Thomas is a common name, especially in Wales. To be linked to the Clan, Thomason needs to have origins in the eastern highland counties of Scotland.

Research needs to be conducted along standard lines as advised in any good "how to" book or internet sites such as familysearch. 

Thoms
(Sweden)

(045)

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Added 15/10/13

Q

The enquirer's ancestor is said to be Bertha Thoms; born in 1859 in Grossbetov (?), Scotland; married Ernst Schultz and died in Kreigerwald (?), Germany in 1918.  She would like to know more about Bertha, where she was born and the Thoms family history. 

R

Sennachie advised that the website Scotlandspeople indicates there were no Thoms births in Scotland in 1859. Nor did he find any Bertha Thoms born about 1859, or a Schultz/Thoms marriage, by doing a general search.  That means the enquirer needs to start at the start.  First step would be to read about research generally and in Germany and Scotland in particular; perhaps by going to familysearch.org. Then standard research should lead to obtaining Bertha's marriage and 1918 death certificates from Germany.  These two certificates, hopefully, may clarify her name and place of birth,as there is a possibility her surname may not be Thoms.

For Scottish Place Names go to:

www.scottish-places.info/scotgaz/anyword.html.

For Germany go to: familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Germany_Gazetteers.

Thom
(Canada)

(044)

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Added 13/10/13

Q

The enquirer would like to learn more about his great great grandfather Robert Thom who immigrated from Scotland to Canada sometime before World War I. He mentions that the 1910 Canadian Census reveals six Robert Thom entries with only one coming from Scotland. 

R

Sennachie advised the enquirer to read a basic book (or online) about family history research in Canada as it is not possible to research with the limited information provided. If possible, the enquirer should first establish the names of Robert's parents and the locality where they lived in Scotland from records in Canada, possibly by obtaining his Canadian marriage and death certificates. As an indicator of this challenge, the website ScotlandsPeople revealed that there were 34 births of a Robert Thom from 1890 to 1900. Also the enquirer should speak to his Thom relatives as they may be able to add new information.
If Robert was in the armed forces, his enlistments papers may reveal more, for example, a good website is the Library and Archives Canada page for Soldiers of WWI (Link).

Two websites that may assist are Emigration to Canada (Link) and the Canadian section of Cyndislist (Link).

Macomber
(US)

(043)

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Added 13/10/13

Updated 16/02/13

Q

The enquirer's family name Macomber has been traced to England in the mid 1600's. It seems likely to be of Scottish origin though he can't be sure. He asks if there is any evidence that Macomber is of the MacThomas clan? He is contemplating a DNA test. He advises that he has gone ahead and ordered a kilt in the modern MacThomas tartan and wonders if he has the right to wear it? 

R

Sennachie advised that as yet there is no indication anyone researching Macomber (and variations such as Macumber) has made a definite connection to Scotland. It could be so, but difficult. On the website worldconnect some trees indicate ancestor John Macomber comes from Inverness. If this is so then there is still no positive link to the Clan MacThomas counties. But please see a discussion on this name at:
members.iphouse.com/jim.smilanich/Family/Sources/

stackpole_name.htm
There are responses below to other Macomber enquiries - numbers 8, 13, 26, 32 and 35. The enquirer's Macomber family in England may have originated from one male who settled in England from Scotland in the 16th or 17th centuries. But then again it may be a surname someone in England started to use.
There are a number of people in the US researching this name, and variations, so using DNA can be useful when a group having a similar name exchange their results.
In relation to wearing a tartan, anyone can wear any tartan they like. The problem occurs when the wearer says with certainty it is his/her clan, when it may not be so.

Thomson

(US)

(042)

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Added 02/09/13 

Q

The enquirer asked if her husband's Thomson ancestors are part of Clan MacThomas. His grandfather emigrated from North Ronaldsay, Orkney, Scotland, and has managed to track his family back to 1776 where they were still in Ronaldsay.

R

The Sennachie advised that Thomson is a very popular surname in Scotland and elsewhere, both now and in the past. This makes linking a particular Thomson family to the Clan difficult. Our Chief has said that "Thomson is a very popular name in Scotland. Many Thomsons come from Argyll in the west of Scotland and are likely to be originally MacTavishes, some are from the Borders Region with England and are not affiliated to a Highland Clan. Only those people whose ancestors come from the counties in Eastern Scotland mentioned above are likely to be MacThomases" - namely Perthshire and Angus (and later Fife, Aberdeenshire and Kincardineshire).

To accept a Thomson as a member we would like to see a connection to one of these counties. People have lived in the Orkneys for many centuries, so the family's Thomson line could go way back. More research could prove useful, although it is understood that going back further may be difficult.
The Sennachie suggested contacting someone in the Orkney's for advice. The following website may be useful.

Thomas

(US)

(041)

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Added 29/04/13

Q

The enquirer asked how it is determined whether the Thomas name is part of MacThomas or not? Her husband has been wearing my tartan, Menzies, but would really like his own. His grandfather sung songs to him in Gaelic as a child, as far as we knew he was Welsh. He has traced his grandfather to the ship that sailed from Scotland to the States. 

R

Sennachie advised that the surname Thomas is associated with the Clan mainly because a number of the Chiefs used this surname, namely the 10th, 11th and 12th Chiefs - please click here for details.

At that time the use of surnames was becoming the accepted way to identify a person, and many of the Clan followers would also have taken the surname Thomas. The Chief accepts that there is a connection to the Clan if someone with the surname Thomas today, has ancestors who were born in the eastern highlands of Scotland, eg, the counties of Aberdeen, Perth, Fife, Kincardine.  From the 1600's people started moving to live elsewhere in Scotland and for a Thomas who lived other than in the eastern highlands, hopefully research may prove that they were a family who moved from there.

Did the shipping records indicate where grandfather Thomas came from, ie, a place in Scotland?  Did he come with other members of the family?  Are there records in the US that may indicate his birth place, such as his marriage (if occurred in the US), an obituary in a newspaper?  Perhaps cousins may recall something.

 Tam

(NL)

(040)

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Added 03/02/13

Q

The enquirer asked whether the Society have any information about his ancestor Jean (Jan) Tam who came to the Netherlands in about 1730; he was a Scottish soldier in the Dutch army?

R

Sennachie advised that Tam is the most uncommon name within the Society and in Scotland today. A general search of the internet did not reveal anything. Most parish registers in Scotland start after 1730. Websites to research include familysearch.org and scotlandspeople. 

 Thomson(NZ)

(039)

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

Added 03/02/13

Q

The enquirer is interested in linking his Thomson ancestors to the Clan. He has researched back to 1797 with links to Woodside and the Parish of Old Machar in Aberdeenshire, where they resided until migrating to New Zealand in about 1870. 

R

Sennachie advised that other than establishing a link to the Chief's ancestors, it is difficult to establish an actual name link to the Clan. Therefore, in the case of Thomson, the Chief accepts a link to the Clan if a Thomson ancestor was born in the eastern highland counties of Scotland. This means that the enquirer would be entitled to join the Society. Sennachie gave some general research advice including checking for Scottish related websites at Cyndislist - www.cyndislist.com/uk/sct.  

Thomas

(US)

(038)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 05/12/12

Q

The enquirer's maiden name is Thomas. Her family settled in central Alabama, United States though she does not know when. They have worshipped as Presbyterians for generations. She noticed the notation that stated some Thomas' may not be members of the MacThomas clan. She would like to know if my family is part of the heritage they claim and was wondering if someone could point me in the direction of some good resources. She would like to know if the Thomas's that settled in Alabama are related to the MacThomas clan.  

R

Sennachie advised that the Society accepts an association with the Clan if one of your Thomas ancestors was born in the highlands of eastern Scotland.  Thomas, of course, is very common in Wales.  First step is to check what records you have as the starting point in going back in time starts with you. Then check with members of your extended family to see what they know and you may even find a cousin who has already done some research.  Construct a family tree based on what you know and have learnt from family members.

To help you learn about researching, there are some articles on the Society's website (link).  Go to your local public library and see what they hold on family history, especially "how to" books.  There are lots of free websites that could have useful data and provide guides to researching, for example: familysearch.  You could join a local family history or historical society.

An interesting site to see where names are located in the UK is

gbnames.publicprofiler.org/Surnames.aspx

McCombs

(NK)

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Added 06/09/12

Q

The enquirer had looked at websites to establish the origins of her surname McCombs, including the Clan Society’s website where she found McComb but not McCombs.  Some sites state that McCombs is part of the Clan MacThomas.  Any information on the origin of her surname would be appreciated. 

R

Sennachie advised that many sites giving information about the origin of surnames, tend to take the easy way out, because the compilers want to provide simple and short answers.  If you search for McCombs in familysearch.org, you will find that there are very few results indicating a link to Scotland, let alone to the highland's eastern counties.  And a similar result is obtained by searching gbnames.publicprofiler.org (Link)
A spelling variation could be involved. Many names were changed at the time of settling in a new country or soon after arrival. Trace your family tree back from yourself, perhaps concentrating on your McCombs line and see if you can establish where your McCombs ancestor came from. 

Thomas

(NK)

(036)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 06/09/12

Updated 29/04/13

Q

The enquirer is trying to find out whether he have the right to wear the MacThomas tartan and has no idea where to start. His Grandfather was Scottish and a Thomas. He asked what the correct way to find out would be.

R

Sennachie advised that the Clan MacThomas will accept a connection to the Clan if a Thomas ancestor was born in one of the highland counties of east Scotland.  There is some good information about researching your family history on the Clan web site, in particular click here.
Write down what you know about your parents in relation to the birth details, and what you know about your grandparents. Then you should talk to other family members that may be able to add information.
If you would like to research your family history further, visit your local public library and borrow a family history research "how to" book and take it from there. Such books will also advise on how best to use the internet. Another useful opportunity is to join a local family history society.

Macomber

(USA)

(035)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 08/04/12

Updated 29/04/13

Q 

The enquirer is trying to determine if his surname 'Macomber' is considered a sept of the Clan MacThomas. He will be travelling to Scotland in August 2012, and would very much like to carry out genealogy research whilst visiting. 

R 

Sennachie advised that it is not possible to link this name to the Clan or even to Scotland. The enquirer's family may have come from England or possibly Ireland. The prefixes Mc or Mac do not automatically indicate a Scottish connection. Please read the three enquiries about this name below.  If this has not already been done, research back to the first settler in the USA, to see what the records says about his origins. The problem is that early USA records are likely not to reveal the necessary information. 

McComas

(USA)

(034)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 08/04/12

Q

The enquirer is researching his last name but seems to be hitting a wall when it comes to the "origins" of the name and has made a promise to speak the language of his origins but does not know if it is Irish, Scottish or whatever? 

R

Sennachie advised that the Chief will accept a person with the surname McComas as having a past link with the Clan in Scotland.  This name is not associated with any other Scottish Clan. If not already done so, research the family history in America and try to establish the earliest McComas ancestor there and hopefully find out where he came from or where was he born (both may be difficult).  There are a number of websites that show information about the origins of this name. A good site to search is: www.familysearch.org.
It is likely that the country of origin is either Scotland or Ireland.  With Ireland many Scots settled there in the 1500s and 1600s but it is difficult to find specific records proving a particular McComas in Ireland came from Scotland.  However it is usually accepted that this happened. 

Watt

(Scotland)

(033)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 08/04/12

Q

The enquirer is researching the 71st Fraser Regiment 1775-1784. There was an exhibition in 1889 where a number of military items of the 71st belonging to Lt Thomas Watt were loaned by Sheriff Thoms. He asked if there was a will of Sheriff Thoms that might show more about these items. 

R 

Sennachie advised that the 15th Chief was Patrick Hunter Thoms and he married Grace Watt. Their first son George McThomas Thoms, Sheriff of Dundee, was the 16th Chief. Their second son was Thomas Watt Thoms.  Lt Thomas Watt was likely to be a relative, possibly Grace's father.  The Chief's tree can be viewed on this website - link.
And a tree for the Watt family on ancestry.com - link.
Wills are indexed on the Scotlandspeople website. An index of Clan names extracted from the wills index can be viewed under Genealogy - MacThomas Data on this website, and while Patrick's will is listed, George does not appear in the index. 

Maycumber

(USA)

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Added 08/04/12

Q

The enquirer is trying to trace the origins of his last name. He has read that Maycumber is a variation of McCombie but the spelling and pronunciation changed after coming to the USA. He asks if the Society have any information about this? 

R

Sennachie has not heard of the surname Maycumber, especially within the Clan.  Maycumber does not appear as a surname outside of the USA, indicating the spelling of the name was probably varied after the enquirer's ancestor arrived in the US.  It could well be a spelling variation of McCombie.  Is there any evidence of where the Maycumber ancestor came from?  Please see the research suggestions mentioned in other enquiries below.

McComas

(USA)

(031)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 07/01/12

Q
The enquirer is researching her paternal great grandmother who was a McComas. The family history is back to 9th great grandfather Daniel Alexander McComas who emigrated from Scotland to Maryland, US in 1693. There is a story on ancestry.com that he was Captain of the Guard at Edinburgh and escaped Scotland with a price on his head with 55 others though there is no documentation to confirm this. If this is true, however, then its likely that the family is of Clan MacThomas and not of Clan Gunn which also claims McComas as a sept, perhaps connected to Thomaidh Mor. Any advice on establishing a link to the Clan MacThomas would be appreciated.
R
Sennachie explained that the problem, common amongst Americans having Scottish ancestry, is that many cannot make the link between America and Scotland as the early records don't give any clues. Hence assumptions are made that are most likely incorrect. Sennachie could not say whether the story of the Captain of the Guard, is true. Perhaps a search of the National Archives of Scotland online documents may assist.
Now turning to the McComas link to the two Clans - Gunn and MacThomas. Our Chief accepts a link to the Clan MacThomas if someone with an ancestor bearing a Clan sept name has origins in the Highland counties on the mid north east of Scotland, eg: Perthshire, Aberdeen Shire, Kincardineshire, Fife and Angus. The Clan Gunn is based in the Orkneys and some of the close by northern counties, hence quite different if one can find evidence of origin.
Of all the sons of our 7th Chief, John McComie, it has been proved that only Angus, the youngest and 10th Chief, had male descendants. Until recently it was thought that Thomas did not marry. But recently, on the National Archives of Scotland website, we found evidence he had married. To date there is no evidence Thomas and his wife had children. Also the surname McComas has not been used by any generations in the Chief's line.
Sennachie also explained that not all people with Clan surnames will be related to the Clan Chiefs. Any person could be part of the Clan in the early days by simply acknowledging loyalty to the Chief and be a follower. This is one of the reasons why most Clans have a number of septs.

Comee

(USA)

(030)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 24/12/11

Q

The enquirer's Grandfather was a Comey and she had long known her family decended from David Comee who came to America in the mid 1600’s. She stumbled upon our website about the McCombie Clan and especially John McComie (7th chief) who she believes was David’s father. Any information would be appreciated.

R
Sennachie accepts that its more than likely that Comey was Comee, was Comie, and probably linked to a Clan name. He asks if the enquirer has evidence that the line originated in Scotland other than drawing this conclusion from David's name. Many researchers have looked at the family of our 7th Chief John McComie or as recorded in official documents John McIntosh, and the conclusion is that he did not have a son David. There are documents of his time that state who were his sons, and they are those listed on our website. At that time followers of the Chief of a Clan could and did take the surname of a Chief. It could be this is the case of David or his ancestors. Also the 7th Chief had a great uncle David, who would have been born in the mid 1500s. Perhaps the enquirer's David was a grandson of this David. It will be quite difficult to obtain proof as there are no parish registers of that time. One needs to depend on documents such as those found on the website of the National Archives of Scotland (link).

Thom

(USA)

(029)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 30/11/11

Q

This enquirer has been trying to establish a connection to the MacThomas Clan. He has hit a "brick wall" around 1780 as from that year his Thom ancestors were weavers in the Dumfries area. He notes that the "The History of the Clan MacThomas" book states there was a Thom group in Dumfries for at least 400 years. He requested advice on how to proceed.

R
Sennachie advised the member that the Chief accepts that anyone with surname Thom having a connection to Scotland is likely to be connected to the Clan and that their descendants can join the Clan Society. There are three main reasons for not making a link to the Glenshee area: Firstly surnames of Clan members changed over time, and a clear example of this is the Chief's ancestors - MacIntosh to MacComie, Thomas, Thoms, MacThomas. Secondly because of lack of parish registers pre 1700's. Thirdly, when one gets back to the 1700's there are usually a number of people with the same names in a parish.
 
As the enquirer had read in the Chief's book the Clan was centred in Glenshee and Glenisla, but because of political disruption in the late 1600's members of the Clan dispersed around Scotland. This could be done, without leaving a paper trail showing a link between the new location and the Clan district. You can see the spread of Clan names in searching sites such as familysearch.org. Maybe one day information may become available through the ease of accessing the internet that may help to make the connection.

Thom

(USA)

(028)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 30/11/11

Q

A member asked for advice on researching back in time from his ancestor George Thom, born Stonehaven, Aberdeenshire, in 1780. George married Elizabeth Richardson and died in London in 1815.

R

Sennachie suggested searching a number of websites, especially Scotlandspeople. It is interesting that George and Elizabeth used the names Richardson, Abercrombie, Fraser and Ogilvie as middle given names for several of their children. As these are likely to be the surnames of earlier ancestors then look for marriages involving these surnames. The Sennachie found a George Thom marrying an Elizabeth Richardson on 7th April 1787 in Kincardine so the birth of George in 1870 may be the wrong person.

Thomason

(USA)

(027)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 30/10/11

Q

An enquirer asked if there is a connection of the name Thomason to the Clan. He had found that some internet sources indicate a link.
R

Sennachie is unaware of a connection. Searching the internet reveals the name generally does not appear in the eastern highland counties of Scotland. Note that it is also present in England and the Shetland Islands. There is a Rootsweb mailing list for Thomason and that list, over the years, has not raised the possibility of a connection to the Clan MacThomas. The distribution of Thomason is also confirmed by searching the site

http://gbnames.publicprofiler.org/default.aspx

There is some misleading information on the internet relating to the sept names of the Clan. Thomason may originate from the name Thomas which is a sept name of the Clan. However, Thomas is a common name, especially in Wales. To be linked to the Clan, Thomas needs to have origins in the eastern highland counties of Scotland.

McComber

(USA)

(026)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 14/10/11

Q

An enquirer wondered if McComber could be a spelling variation of McComb. The name appears not to be related to Scotland, but the enquirer wondered if the Society had any more information.

R

Sennachie confirmed that McComber (or McCumber) does not appear in early Scottish records but does appear in England. Knowing that the surnames of early settlers to the USA were changed on occasions soon after arrival, it is possible that McComb became McComber, but unlikely, especially as the sound of the two names are different. The website ancestry.com indicates Irish with Anglo background. A possible course of action for USA people is to compare DNA for McComber and McComb.

Thomson

(NZ)

(025)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 27/08/11

Q

The enquirer is keen to find out whether he is of MacThomas or MacTavish. The furthest he has been able to go back is to a John Thomson who was born circa 1797 in Clackmannan and married a Christian Miller on December 10 1820 in Clackmannan.

R

Sennachie advised that our Society accepts a link to the Clan MacThomas if the Thomson ancestor can be linked, usually through BDM records or census returns, to the eastern counties of Scotland in the highlands; this generally means Perthshire, Angus, Fife, Aberdeenshire and Kincardineshire. Clackmannan borders the old Perthshire county to the south. The enquirer should search for John's baptism on the Scotlandspeople website. If he lived to after 1851, then check the census returns, as that may confirm where he was born. As John was born in Clackmannan and if it is not possible to go back further than this, it will probably be up to the enquirer to choose MacThomas or MacTavish. That is, if he feels a connection to the Clan MacThomas then its likely that he would be accepted as a member of the Clan based on the link to Clackmannan.

McCombie

(USA)

(024)

     

    

    

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

   

  

   

   

   

Added 27/08/11

Q

The enquirer is hoping to verify the suspicion of a link from my family (John McCombie, 1795 who migrated to Nova Scotia) to Joseph McCombie (who married Isobel Gray 1756), to John McCombie of Forter 1607 as it may be traceable back through the MacThomas Clan. Also, is a MacThomas Family tree of some type available?

R

Sennachie advised that the linking of early settlers in the US/Can with Clan surnames can be quite difficult due to limited information in relation to the parents and birth place of those settlers. Also records in Scotland tend not to give information about Scots who settled in overseas countries, although one source that may provide a connection is probate. On this website under Genealogy - Family Trees there are trees relating to the present Chief's ancestors, including Iain Mor (John Macomie) 7th Chief, who some researchers say was born in 1607 but there is no evidence of this. As yet, there is no known link between the 7th Chief and Joseph McCombie. Also under Genealogy - Articles there is a good article about the McCombie sept of the Clan. There are references to John on the internet such as on familytreemaker.

McCombs

(Canada)

(023)

  

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 27/08/11

Q

A Canadian Society member enquired about her McCombs ancestors from Ireland. Thomas McCombs, who married in 1818 to Elizabeth Brooks, was born in Roscrea, Co Tipperary, in 1796, the son of William McCombs and Bridget Perkinson. Thomas and a brother Frances emigrated to Canada; they were protestants. Is it possible to find a link to Scotland?

R

Sennachie advised that it will be difficult to make the link to Scotland. References to a number of sites were provided including www.irishgenealogical.org, www.rootsireland.ie and www.genuki.org.uk. The member should also check to see if anyone else is researching this family. William's occupation may give a clue as he may have been brought to Ireland (if born in Scotland) because of his skills. Probably the best advice is to engage a professional researcher in Tipperary if information cannot be found on the internet and in published sources. A possible Scottish connection could be William McComb who was baptised on 1 March 1773 Wigtown - from familysearch.org.

Thomson

(UK)

(022)Added

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14/07/11

Q

Enquirer is trying to track her father's family tree but has been unable find any of his relatives. Her father's name is Alexander Thomson and in the 1950's his parents lived in Lanark. He married the enquirer's mother in 1950 and had at least one half brother. It is believed that he was born in or around 1926.

R

Sennachie advised that Thomson is a sept name of the Clan, but one of the enquirer's Thomson ancestors must have been born in the eastern highland counties of Scotland.
The enquirer needs to look at the indexes and records on the scotlandspeople website. Perhaps also read their guides online. The enquirer should be able to purchase her parents' marriage certificate from them.

Usually the first steps in research include speaking to all close relatives to see what they can recall and also to see if they have any documents that may help. Obtaining a "how to" book of family history research is also a good idea. It may be helpful to join a local family history society since they can usually provide good advice.

Thomas

(NZ)

(021)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 08/07/11

Q

The enquirer is not sure whether he is descended from a MacThomas or not. His late father offered this explanation as one alternative, and a 5th cousin in Australia says that many of his ancestors believed that they were. Another alternative is that they were a sept of the Buchanan Clan. Certainly there were Thomas' in Stirlingshire before the MacThomas clan disbanded. They can get back to 1733 and there are another two generations prior but recent research suggests that while these were almost definitely relatives, they are not in the direct line. He have identified several of my Thomas ancestors in the wills list.

R

Sennachie advised that the name Thomas is relatively common and is especially widely connected to Wales. However, the connection to the Clan MacThomas comes about through use of this name by several Chiefs in the 17th and 18th century and was possibly used by other clansfolk. You can see this link by looking at the Chiefs' trees on our website under Genealogy - Family Trees. It can be difficult to get absolute proof of a Thomas ancestor's link to the Clan MacThomas. Our Chief has indicated in his recent book that its probably acceptable if your Thomas ancestor came from eastern Scotland, especially the counties of Perth, Angus, Aberdeen and Fife. Stirlingshire is a possibility but, as you have indicated, it could be another Clan. In the end if you are interested in joining our Society you could put your tree to our Chief for his consideration.

Thoms

(UK)

(020)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 05/06/11

Q
Great great grandfather, William Charles Thoms was born approximately 1814 in Scotland. He moved to live in Bethnal Green, London and our first record of him is his marriage to Martha Eliza Munro on 21 December 1834 at St. Mary's Lambeth, Surrey. His occupation was as a book binder. He died in 1854 in Shoreditch. Most of the records show him as Thomas but he signed his name in the marriage register as Thoms. Can you please give me some guidance as to how I can discover his Scottish roots?
R

You need to find where William was born so as to be certain of linking to a Thoms/Thomas baptism in Scotland. Perhaps the key record will be the 1851 England and Wales census as this could show where in Scotland he was born. There is also the 1841 census but it will only indicate if he was born in the County of residence or not. You can access the census returns on a site such as findmypast.com or ancestry.com (both require payment).
Also his death certificate may give you his father's name. This would help you narrow your searching for William's baptism. You could try to find a William Charles Thoms (or variation) born about 1814 on the scotlandspeoplewebsite (requires payment). One of the issues for you is that he may have been baptised without the inclusion of his second given name which did occur. Another site to try is familysearch.org.

Hunter

(South Africa)

(019)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 10/04/11

Q

Enquirer has recently commenced researching his family history and his grandmother is Eliza Hunter the daughter of Charles Leitch Hunter of Edinburgh. Is there any connection to the Clan MacThomas?

R

Sennachie advised that the purpose of the Society and the Society's website is to promote an interest in the MacThomas Clan based on the surnames recognised as being part of the Clan, especially if their ancestors came from the eastern highlands of Scotland. The surname Hunter is not a sept name of the Clan. This means we do not collect data on people with the name Hunter unless they marry into one of the sept names. Sennachie suggested that the enquirer use recommended research techniques as mentioned on this site and also check the Clan Hunter website.

McComb

(Not Known)

(018)

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 04/04/11

Q
As the enquirer's grandmother was a McComb he was wondering how he should go about getting information on how to find or trace this genealogy?
R
Sennachie advised that much will depend upon where the enquirer lives. Although researching a family history is done in much the same way, the records in various countries can be different. He should research his McComb line by obtaining his grandmother's birth, marriage and death certificates (if deceased). These documents may give him enough information to seek the birth and marriage records of her father. By doing this for each generation as far back as possible he may find that he has ancestors from Scotland. Other records, such as wills and census returns can help discover his ancestors. Under Genealogy on this website there is advice on research techniques; other genealogy websites may also provide advice. Once he has an outline of his McComb tree, other sites such as ancestry.com and familysearch.org may reveal other people who have researched the same family. Local libraries may also have books on researching family history, and assistance may be provided by a local family history society or historical society.

Macomb

(USA)

(017)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 02/04/11

Q

The enquirer advised that her paternal linage is Macomb. She asked whether this surname has been considered as a variant of McComb within the Clan?

R

Sennachie advised that in addition to the possibility of Macomb being a variation of McComb it could be a variation of MacOmbie, another Clan name.
Spelling variations happened more than people realise, especially at times of settling in a new country. It appears Macomb is found mainly in the USA. It does not register in the UK on the website of Great Britain Family Names (link). If further research establishes a connection to the eastern highlands of Scotland then our Chief may accept descendants as members of our Clan.

McCombie

(Australia)

(016)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 29/03/11

Q

The enquirer has traced his daughter's ancestry and found that her great great grandfather was Charles Field McCombie born in South Leith, Midlothian. He believes Charles' parents were Charles McCombie and Elizabeth Field, both of Aberdeenshire. He would like to know if this research is reasonable and seeks more background information.

R

Sennachie advised that this conclusion does look reasonable and further research using the website Scotlandspeople may prove the link to Aberdeenshire by obtaining extracts from the census returns and the parish registers. Further information can be found on the website familysearch.org. For more information on the family and about Aberdeenshire in general may be obtained by looking at the website of the Aberdeen & North East Scotland Family History Society (link) and similar history sources.

Thomson

(Australia)

(015)

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

Added 27/02/11

Q

The enquirer would like to be satisfied that he has a connection to the Clan with a view to becoming a member. His ancestor Robert Thomson emigrated to New Zealand in 1864. Robert's father, also named Robert, was born in 1807 in St Andrews, Fife and married Henrietta Hodge in Fife in 1826.

R
The Sennachie advised that the best website to use in looking up Scottish records is Scotlandspeople. Another useful site is the Fife Family History Society (link). As the enquirer has evidence that his ancestor was born in Fife, the Chief has advised that he is welcome to join the Society.

Thom

(South Africa)

(014)

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 13/02/11

Q

The enquirer has limited knowledge of his Thom family in South Africa, although it is said his great grandfather came from Scotland. The name Bryson is used in the family as a given name. The enquirer is interested in joining the Clan Society.

R

The Sennachie advised that it would be useful to visit a local public library and read about techniques in researching family history. Once there is proof of a link to Scotland then you would be most welcome to join. This can be done by obtaining relevant birth, death and marriage certificates of South African ancestors. Sennachie provided links to familysearch and an appropriate website relating to research in South Africa.

Macomber

(USA)

(013)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 13/02/11

Q

The enquirer was interested to know if anyone has made a link between USA residents named Macomber and the Clan. He has been able to get back to Dublin with a possible link to Northumberland. He says his heart is Scottish without any proof.

R

Sennachie advised that Macomber is a very unusual name in the UK with most entries on the website familysearch being English. He is not aware of any person or reference suggesting the name is linked to the Clan MacThomas. If there is an answer of a link to Scotland it is probably somewhere in records held in the USA or a remote chance of a mention in an early Scottish will.

Thomson
(USA)

(012)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 02/01/11

Q

The enquirer appreciated that as Thomson was more common this surname does not appear in most of the indexes on the Clan website, and asked, if his Thomson ancestor was born in Arbroath, Angus, with his parents having married in Marykirk, Kincardineshire, is it reasonable to deduce a link to the Clan MacThomas.

R

The Sennachie advised that in the Chief's recent book on The History of the Clan MacThomas, it states on page 161 that people with Clan sept names did settle in Kincardineshire and Angus so it is reasonable to assume a connection. Also in relation to checking indexes, for example the wills index on Scotlandspeople, most can be searched without paying a fee.

Thom

(England)

(011)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

Added 02/01/11

Q

A member needed assistance to overcome a common challenge in trying to establish the parents of Robert Thom who married Margaret Ritchie in May 1807 at New Monkland in Lanarkshire. They had at least three children, Robert in November 1807, James in June 1809 and William in March 1811.

R

The 1841 and 1851 Census returns were searched and another couple, Robert Thom and Elizabeth Pettigrew, were researched in case there was a connection. The Sennachie agreed that a solution could be found in the Census returns if Robert and Margaret lived till then. A search of the registers and wills on Scotlandspeople might also be worthwhile. Tracking what happened to Robert's brothers may also reveal clues. From familysearch, Robert Thom, baptised on 30 March 1788 at Old Monkland may be the enquirer's ancestor. The member would like to make contact with others researching Robert and Margaret.

Thompson

(USA)

(010)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 26/09/10

Q

The enquirer asked if his name, Thompson, was connected to the Clan. He has been told that his grandfather who died in the USA in 1995 was Scottish.

R

The Sennachie advised that the enquirer needs to do some basic family history research - obtain his great grandfather's birth, marriage and/or death certificates, as they may say where he was born. If he was born in the USA then he needs to do the same for his father and so on until he finds his Thompson ancestor who emigrated to the USA. There are articles about doing family history research on this website and other family history sites. Sometimes a person's name changed and its possible the earliest ancestor in the USA had a name spelt Thomson which is one of our Clan names.

Assuming there has not been a spelling change, the Sennachie advised that the enquirer's Thompson ancestors are probably not connected to the Clan MacThomas. The name is mainly found in England and in the lowland area of Scotland. There is no official Clan Thompson.

McIntosh
(Australia)

(009)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 19/09/10

Q

The enquirer is researching his McIntosh ancestors back to John McIntosh in Scotland and considers that there is a possibility this John is John McComie the grandson of our 5th Chief John McComie and brother of our 6th Chief Alexander McComie and asked if we had any information that may help.

R

The Sennachie advised that the present Chief’s tree indicates that tradition records this John went to live in Fife but after checking the Clan article in the Society’s magazine no additional information was available. There could be information in such books as A M Mackintosh’s book Mackintosh Families in Glenshee and Glenisla published in 1916.

Macomber

(USA)
(008)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 19/09/10

Q

The enquirer is researching her Macomber line who came from Dorset England in 1630's. Legend says they were Scotsmen. Do you have any resources to help track down this family? The only time frame that fits the family leaving Scotland would be after the Battle of Pinkie in 1547.

R

The Sennachie advised that the Society does not have information that would link the Dorset Macombers with Scotland. The problem is that in Scotland there are very few parish records pre 1600 and similarly in England pre 1550.If there is a record linking the Dorset Macombers with Scotland, it could be in a record such as a will, say of a parent in Scotland leaving something to a child in Dorset. The Sennachie noted that others on the internet are interested in the McOmbers of Dorset, but none give an a link to Scotland.

McCombie
(Canada)

(007)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 19/09/10

Q
A member asked if the Society has a database of McCombies. Alexander, the son of John McCombie the Tidesman and his wife Jane Barnet - possibly went to the West Indies and (among other things) designed a big Kirk there (destroyed in the hurricane recently ), was the Editor of the paper in St George's Grenada in the 1830's and was responsible for building a water system for both St George's Grenada and castries St Lucia.
R

The Sennachie advised that the Society has yet to develop such a database. In IGI (familysearch.org) someone considers William McCombie (born c1720) married Marjorie Wishart in 1748 both in Scotland. And three people consider their son Alexander was born in about 1746/1749. Then checking the website "worldconnect" there are three William McCombie/Marjory Wishart trees.One shows William's father as Sandy and another Robert McCombie and Isabel Ritchie. There is nothing on Gencircles.One tree on the Pedigree section of the IGI takes Robert and Isabel back further to our 7th Chief. But this has son Alexander dying in Scotland.

           

It is likely that any further evidence will come from a document in the USA or in Scotland - for example an old will made in Scotland leaving something to a son/daughter in the new world.

McComb
(USA)

(006)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 19/09/10

Q

The enquirer asked about a possible link between Mecum/Macom and McComb. Through DNA testing my family has come to believe it was McComb or McCombs or some variation that was misspelt into Macom in the early Virginia Colony, USA. It evolved into Mecom, then Mecum. Do you think we could be descendants of people from the MacThomas Clan who migrated from, possibly, Scotland, to, possibly, Ireland, to, possibly, the Isle of Wight in Virginia, USA, in the 1600s?

R

The Sennachie looked at past copies of the Society's magazine and found no reference to Mecum or variations. A general search for Macom in the IGI (familysearch.org) indicated that this spelling is a variation of McComb/McCombe. An exact spelling search in the British Isles showed that this name and its variations occur mostly in England, with a few in Scotland. The suggested link is possible and, if DNA comparison between the enquirer's family and males with the name McComb indicates a strong match, then its likely there is a link.

Thom
(Canada)

(005)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 01/08/10

Q

The enquirer thought that his Thom ancestors came from Scotland, to England, Germany, then to South Africa. My Grandparents are Albertus (Bertie) Thom and Johanna (Joey) Maria Magdelena Olivier. Also Hess is said to be a surname in my family. Can you please advise on research.

R

The Sennachie advised the enquirer to go back as far possible in South Africa. That is, find the first Thom ancestor who arrived in South Africa as this may help to establish where he came from. Certainly the name Thom appears in Germany as many Scottish people went to that area centuries ago. It might be useful to join a local family history society or historical society. The local library may know of any such groups. Another suggestion is to contact all known Thom relatives and ask them what they know. The Sennachie did some searching on the internet using the grandparent's name , in Google, Worldconnect, Familysearch and Gencircle, but found nothing. The following two websites may be helpful:

www.ancestry24.com

www.southafrica.info/services/genealogy.htm

Thomas
(USA)

(004)

 

 

 

*

* 

*

*

* 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 01/08/10

Q

The enquirer is a descendant of Ezra N. Thomas, who apparently was born in Scotland in 1774, served in the USA War of 1812, and died in Furnaceville, New York. He asked if the Sennachie could help him trace his ancestry to the MacThomas Clan.

R

The Sennachie advised that Thomas, being a more common name in the Clan, can be difficult to research. His first observation was that Ezra is a most unusual given name in Scotland. It is certainly a name used often in the 18th and 19th century in the USA. The www.familysearch.org site includes most baptisms for Scotland but the enquirer's Ezra does not appear. The website to use in order to search for a baptism in Scotland is www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk. It charges a fee. The Sennachie suggested that the enquirer needs to get more evidence in New York about Ezra's link to Scotland. For example the early 1800's USA census returns may reveal where he was born. Also, if there was an obituary for Ezra, then that may reveal his origins. His war papers may reveal more information.

Thom

(South Africa)

(003)

 

 

 

 *

*

*

*

   *

*

*

*

*    

Added 01/08/10

Q

The enquirer wondered how he could find out more about his Thom family history. He needed some help in order to get started. He asked if the Sennachie could point him in the right direction?

R

The Sennachie responded "You have asked a very broad question and it depends upon just how far you want to go. On this website under The Clan > Genealogy >Articles there is piece that I wrote entitled "Beginning your family history". Please read this. Just briefly write down what you know about your parents, grandparents etc, such as birth, marriage and death dates, talk to your relatives to see what they know, obtain your birth certificate and then work backwards getting such information. Some you may be able to get off the internet and other from books. You could join your local family history society or historical society, and the Clan MacThomas Society. Go to your local library and borrow a book on family history research. There are guides on some family history websites such as familysearch.org.

Cumbie

(USA)

(002)

 

 

 

 

Added 05/07/10

Q

The enquirer's great-great-great-great grandfather, Leander (or Lee Andrew) Cumbie was, he believes, born in Scotland circa 1758. By 1784, he was in South Carolina, USA. Is there a link to Scotland and the Clan MacThomas?

R

Cumbie may well be a spelling variation of Combie, a Clan sept name, but first there is a need to find evidence from USA records that he was from Scotland as in those times Cumbie was also evident in England.

Thomson

(Australia)
(001)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Added 05/07/10

Q

The enquirer was researching the name Thompson from about the early 1800s and Thomson prior to that time. The earlist record she could find in the ancestral line was the marriage bans of a William Thomson and Elizabeth Duncan in the parish register of Liff Benvie and Invergowrie, Angus in 1814. Can you suggest some family history centres where she might be able to attend to do some research, possibly in the Dundee area, or in Edinburgh?

R

The Sennachie suggested more research avenues in Australian records and drew attention to the explanation of the sept names set out in the Chief's recent book on the Clan. He suggested the following sites relating to centres to visit:

 

Added 04/07/2010

Updated 05/01/2011

Updated on dates shown against individual entries 

                                                         |Secretaries|